CENTRE OF SIERRA LEONE STUDIES

The country of Sierra Leone has a long and interesting history. It holds a unique place in the development of the continent of Africa. As such it deserves to have an academic institution, based on its own soil, that serves as the most informed and respected place of study and source of information available to those wanting to further their knowledge of the country and its people. We hope that, over a period of time, we can develop a centre of learning that attracts scholars from across Africa and elsewhere.

In order to commence this ambitious project, we will use all the modern digital tools available to us. We will begin by building both an anthology of materials available in all academic disciplines and providing a detailed bibliography of work stored elsewhere and currently being researched and where this maybe viewed and incorporated into the work of scholars studying  and writing on all aspects of Sierra Leone.

A further source of information will be the respected ‘Journal of Sierra Leone Studies’, which will be based at The Centre and subsequent editions will include both peer-reviewed academic papers and other items of interest and use to those wanting to study and know more about Sierra Leone.

If anyone has documents, photographs or other items that will be of use to scholars and would like to donate them to us, please send them The Centre, where they will allow us to build the non-digital section of the materials available to all wanting to study and further their interest in Sierra Leone.

Fr. Joe Turay – Principal, University of Makeni
John Birchall – Adviser  and contributor to The Centre

The Centre of Sierra Leone Studies,
University of Makeni,
Makeni,
The Republic of Sierra Leone

jsls

Welcome to The Journal of Sierra Leone Studies. This is the first Journal dedicated solely to Sierra Leone to have been published for a long time. We hope that it will be of use to academics, students and anyone with an interest in what for many is a rather ‘special’ country.

The need for collaborative research related to the global diaspora of Africans and their descendants is challenging because the documentation is extensive, multilingual and scattered around the world in hundreds of archives, libraries, churches, courthouses, government offices, museums, ports and personal collections. The overall aim of THE LIBERATED AFRICANS PROJECT is to bring together as much data as possible regarding the transnational links between these international courts and piece together the lives of over 200,000 Liberated Africans from the worldwide collection of sources to open them up for further research and discussion.

The need for collaborative research related to the global diaspora of Africans and their descendants is challenging because the documentation is extensive, multilingual and scattered around the world in hundreds of archives, libraries, churches, courthouses, government offices, museums, ports and personal collections. The overall aim of THE LIBERATED AFRICANS PROJECT is to bring together as much data as possible regarding the transnational links between these international courts and piece together the lives of over 200,000 Liberated Africans from the worldwide collection of sources to open them up for further research and discussion.